Tag: literary fiction

Six Literary Scares This Spooky Season

Six Literary Scares This Spooky Season

‘Tis the season for some of the most fun genre fiction. Stalwarts like Stephen King will always be around for reliable scares, but some novels that sit on the boundary of literary fiction and genre horror also serve well-deserved creeps. Whether you’re looking to get into the Halloween spirit or just enjoy the crisp weather […]

Posted in: Books and Authors
The Oral History Podcast, Episode 21: Young Adult or Literary Fiction? Who Decides?

The Oral History Podcast, Episode 21: Young Adult or Literary Fiction? Who Decides?

  In this episode of The Oral History Podcast, we ask why some books about teenagers are labeled “YA,” while others are marketed as “literary fiction.” Tell us what you think on our Facebook page or via email (feedback AT theoralhistorypodcast DOT com). Click to subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher   SHOW NOTES   Our current reads […]

Posted in: Young Adult
Canon Fodder: Ten Novels That Blow Up the Classics
By October 26, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Canon Fodder: Ten Novels That Blow Up the Classics

In the world of popular intellectual property, nothing is left to waste. Whether it’s new stories in the same universe (Rogue One: A Star Wars Story) or the continuation of a dead author’s series (Robert B. Parker’s Slow Burn, by Ace Atkins), characters and settings are often cannibalized for a commercial motive. Then there are authors who […]

Big Words: Literary Covers, Reviewed

Big Words: Literary Covers, Reviewed

With few exceptions, fall is the season when publishers release their biggest books, a batch that inevitably includes the year’s most anticipated literary novels. Whatever your definition of or feelings towards literary fiction, we call all agree that it is a thing that exists. (Right? Right?) But literary merit is not my concern. Instead, I’ve turned my attention to the way publishers […]

Posted in: Books and Authors
Brooklyn Binge: Buzz Books set in the Booming Borough

Brooklyn Binge: Buzz Books set in the Booming Borough

If your book group enjoys reading fiction set in New York, two recent literary novels centered in and around Brooklyn bring the borough vividly to life. Emma Straub’s Modern Lovers supplies some of the same charm I appreciated in Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings. Set in Brooklyn—Ditmas Park, to be exact—it follows a group of friends who have known each […]

Posted in: Book Groups
Epic Novel, Epic Theater: Roberto Bolano’s 2666
By February 18, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Epic Novel, Epic Theater: Roberto Bolano’s 2666

The first-ever staging of the challenging and complex novel does it full justice—though you don’t have to read the book before seeing the play. The set is minimal. Three bright green, wheeled chairs are parked behind two white, narrow tables on which stand four name plates. This is an easily overlooked detail, especially for audience members […]

Posted in: Books and Authors
Get to Know the Harold Washington Literary Fiction Book Group
By February 16, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Get to Know the Harold Washington Literary Fiction Book Group

This Chicago Public Library book group is led by a team of reference librarians who work together to choose titles, then evaluate how each meeting went with reports which they use for future discussions. Despite major leadership on the part of the librarians, the group members and their reading interests direct the group’s selections. Click […]

Posted in: Book Groups
Field of Dreams and Drought: Jane Smiley’s Golden Age
By October 20, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

Field of Dreams and Drought: Jane Smiley’s Golden Age

A century of change in three novels about one Iowa farm family. With Golden Age, Smiley grandly concludes her Last Hundred Years trilogy, a multigenerational saga about the Langdons, an Iowa farm family. The story began in 1920 in Some Luck (2014), reached 1986 in Early Warning (2015), and stretches into the very near future […]

Posted in: Books and Authors
The Time of “Strangenesses”: Salman Rushdie’s Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights
By September 8, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

The Time of “Strangenesses”: Salman Rushdie’s Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights

Rushdie’s thirteenth novel offers a delectable update of One Thousand and One Nights. The jinn, Rushdie tells us, are “creatures made of smokeless fire,” shape-shifters infused with powers that defy our experience of gravity and time. They live in their own world, yet they can’t resist meddling in our affairs. But the Lightning Princess is […]

Posted in: Books and Authors

Is There a Movie in This? Hanging Out with David Foster Wallace at The End of the Tour

The End of the Tour, which opens nationwide tomorrow, has a funny habit of keeping David Foster Wallace offscreen. He first appears in the film through a tape recorder, as David Lipsky listens to their five-day interview for Rolling Stone in 1996 in the wake of Wallace’s suicide in 2008. But even after the audience meets […]