Tag: book reviews

Empowering Young Women, Politically and Personally: Two New Titles for Teens

Empowering Young Women, Politically and Personally: Two New Titles for Teens

Think you know the f-word and the v-word? These two titles might change your mind. Feminism has come a long way from the fight for suffrage, and in its current manifestation, it can be difficult for some to determine precisely what feminism stands for or, indeed, if it’s necessary at all. It seems like women have more […]

Resurrecting an American Writer: Constance Fenimore Woolson
By February 29, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Resurrecting an American Writer: Constance Fenimore Woolson

A new biography and a newly compiled story collection bring attention to the unjustly forgotten Constance Fenimore Woolson. Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–94) was once so famous that debates about her intrepid fiction raged in the press on both sides of the Atlantic. But soon after her death, if she was remembered at all, it was […]

Posted in: Books and Authors
Stories across Time: Iain Pears’ Arcadia
By February 9, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Stories across Time: Iain Pears’ Arcadia

A genre-blending, time-collapsing tour de force in which the power of narrative builds worlds and destroys them. Pears seems to love three-part harmony, though time, not music, is his medium of choice. In Stone’s Fall (2009) and The Dream of Scipio (2002), he weaved remarkably complex stories set in three different time periods that echoed one another, fugue-like, with […]

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Destined for Discussion: Sharon Guskin’s The Forgetting Time and Virginia Reeves’ Work Like Any Other
By February 2, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Destined for Discussion: Sharon Guskin’s The Forgetting Time and Virginia Reeves’ Work Like Any Other

Two daring first novels offer rich fictional worlds and meaty themes sure to get book-clubbers talking. One of the many pleasures of reading fiction is discovering a compelling and imaginative new writer. And one of the joys of falling under the spell of an exciting first novel is sharing your enthusiasm. Choosing books by first-time […]

Posted in: Book Groups
Remembering the Drowned: Ruta Sepetys’ Salt to the Sea
By February 2, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Remembering the Drowned: Ruta Sepetys’ Salt to the Sea

The acclaimed Ruta Sepetys dredges up a sunken German military ship as she fictionalizes the greatest—and surprisingly little-known—tragedy in maritime history. Shipwrecks and maritime disasters are of fathomless interest, with ships such as the Titanic and the Lusitania household names. It’s interesting that the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff during WWII, which led to the largest loss of life […]

Two Daring First Novels: Kathleen Spivack’s Unspeakable Things and Paul Goldberg’s The Yid
By January 26, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Two Daring First Novels: Kathleen Spivack’s Unspeakable Things and Paul Goldberg’s The Yid

Two acclaimed nonfiction writers examine the before and after of World War II, respectively, prewar Europe and postwar Russia—both imperiled by tyrants. Kathleen Spivack and Paul Goldberg may be first-time novelists, but they are seasoned writers. Spivack is a poet and author of the memoir, With Robert Lowell and His Circle (2012). Goldberg is a journalist who […]

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These Soldiers Never Take a Backseat to History: Michael Grant’s Front Lines
By January 26, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

These Soldiers Never Take a Backseat to History: Michael Grant’s Front Lines

Michael Grant’s latest novel is a classic WWII story with a captivating addition—women in the ranks. In many ways, Grant’s latest feels like an old-fashioned war novel—it begins with the soon-to-be soldiers at home, worrying about what they are going to face, and saying good-bye to family. Then they arrive at boot camp, building both […]

Free Culture and the Internet Activist: Two Books about Aaron Swartz
By January 11, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Free Culture and the Internet Activist: Two Books about Aaron Swartz

The rise and tragic fall of “hacktivist” Aaron Swartz, “America’s youngest public-domain enthusiast.” Aaron Swartz was a shy computer prodigy who couldn’t bear to be constrained by institutional hierarchies. As a teen, he was already an independent thinker, programmer, writer, and activist deeply concerned with free and open access to information for the public good. […]

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Retire to What? Jane Bryant Quinn’s How to Make Your Money Last
By January 5, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Retire to What? Jane Bryant Quinn’s How to Make Your Money Last

As baby boomers realize that love may not be all you need, at least to retire, a savvy financial guru comes to their aid. Quinn is one of the country’s leading commentators on finance, a looked-to and highly regarded columnist who addresses such important money concerns as health insurance, social security, and retirement plans. She […]

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Wine and Money: Isabelle Saporta’s Vino Business
By November 10, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

Wine and Money: Isabelle Saporta’s Vino Business

How did French wine become a global commodity, the object of frenzied speculation among international investors? A French journalist tells the melancholy tale. Now that most humans live in a world of safe drinking water, the ubiquitousness of wine as a daily drinking beverage, even for children, has disappeared, replaced by the notion of wine […]

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