Tag: middle-grade fiction

Looking Back on the End of the School Year

Looking Back on the End of the School Year

One of my favorite things about working in a school is the school year cycle itself. I love the momentum and the sense of change. There’s a clear beginning (New school supplies! Bright ideas for lessons! Brand. New. Books!) and a clear end (Collecting all the books! End-of-year reports! Putting in final grades!). OK, the […]

So Many Sequels, So Little Time

So Many Sequels, So Little Time

Lynn: Regular readers know I’m a big fan of fantasy and science fiction. I’m so excited because I recently received new volumes from several of my favorite series. I’ve been begging for them for ages, but suddenly I have a dilemma: I desperately want to reread the first volume in these series before I jump feet first […]

Roald Dahl’s Imaginormous Challenge

Roald Dahl’s Imaginormous Challenge

  Last fall, to commemorate Roald Dahl’s hundredth birthday, the late author’s estate and publisher launched a year-long celebration of all things Dahl. (We celebrated by eating crow—to read all about how Booklist has slagged off Dahl’s writing over the years, click here.) In March, the Roald Dahl Literary Estate and others kicked off Roald Dahl’s Imaginormous Challenge—a contest that closes […]

Bookends Favorites 2016: Lynn’s Favorite Middle-Grade and YA

Bookends Favorites 2016: Lynn’s Favorite Middle-Grade and YA

Lynn: It’s that time again! Time for Cindy and me to announce our favorite books of the year. We are making no attempt to pick the year’s award winners—just to list the books we loved reading in alphabetical order. Because I don’t have Cindy’s discipline and always have a terrible time narrowing my choices, I […]

Carte Blanche: Columnist’s Choice, 2016
By December 22, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Carte Blanche: Columnist’s Choice, 2016

Another year distinguished by a glut of good books has flown by. One of my hardest jobs in the face of such abundance is winnowing the lot to a manageable few of the best; in this case, that means a baker’s dozen selected from an initial list of 27. Ah, the labors of Hercules! Anyway, the […]

Reviews of the Week: Sara Zarr, Neil Gaiman, Brandon Mull, and More!

Reviews of the Week: Sara Zarr, Neil Gaiman, Brandon Mull, and More!

Every weekday, we feature a different review on Booklist Online that highlights starred reviews, high-demand titles, and/or titles especially relevant to our current issue’s spotlight. We’ve collected the reviews from December 12 through 16 below, so that you can revisit the week’s best books.     Monday, December 12 Dad and the Dinosaur, by Gennifer Choldenko Newbery Honor Book author Choldenko […]

The Latest Booklist: Spotlight on Book Discussions

The Latest Booklist: Spotlight on Book Discussions

The December 15 issue of Booklist magazine is now live. Visit Booklist Online, where you’ll find 251 new reviews and 9 new feature articles and lists. The articles will be free to all for the next two weeks—to have unrestricted access, you’ll need to log in. If you aren’t yet a subscriber, or do subscribe but […]

Gumdrop the Elf’s Christmas Confessions
By December 12, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Gumdrop the Elf’s Christmas Confessions

My first job in Chicago—my first job as a college graduate, for that matter—was as a Christmas elf for Marshall Field’s in its final year of existence. My best friend and I drove here from Baltimore in a little Penske truck so that she could pursue her improv dreams at Second City. I tagged along as […]

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Reader, Know Thyself

Reader, Know Thyself

Lynn: Cindy and I have run an after-school book club for 16 years. We try to support our members as a fellowship of readers, encouraging them to read widely and develop literary criticism skills. Our latest lively, opinionated group is coming on fast, and I was thinking about using one of my favorite exercises with […]

Where Lives Are Long and Death Is Gone: Neal Shusterman’s SCYTHE
By November 22, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Where Lives Are Long and Death Is Gone: Neal Shusterman’s SCYTHE

Shusterman’s latest investigates a future world without struggle or desire. Without these, he asks, are we even human? In the year 2042, humans conquered death. Now, in the postmortal society of MidMerica, people can live for millennia, either reanimated from fatal accidents or “turning the corner” when they get old by resetting themselves to a […]

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