Tag: Gr. 4-7

17 Black Hairs: KARMA KHULLAR’S MUSTACHE

17 Black Hairs: KARMA KHULLAR’S MUSTACHE

Lynn: OMG—those middle school years! So much change and heartache, and the smallest of things can cause such anguish. Individual circumstances may differ, but exquisitely painful emotions are the same. Kristi Wientge brings a welcome new voice to the middle-school experience in her funny debut novel, Karma Khullar’s Mustache (2017). As though starting sixth grade […]

Arturo Schomburg’s Book Hunting Disease

Arturo Schomburg’s Book Hunting Disease

Lynn: I wish I could have known Arturo Schomburg. Not only was he passionate about his research, tireless in his efforts to locate information, and relentless in his pursuit of dismissed history, but he strove to give children something he never had: the knowledge of what people with African roots had given to the world. […]

TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE: Practice Recognizing Fake News

TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE: Practice Recognizing Fake News

Cindy: There have been a number of YA fiction books with the title “Two Truths and a Lie,” but we’ve found a creative, informational book for middle-grade students that reinforces evaluating information for truth. Fake news, anyone? Two Truths and a Lie: It’s Alive (2017) by Ammi-Joan Paquette and Laurie Ann Thompson is the first […]

When Life Gives You Lemons, Search for Bigfoot

When Life Gives You Lemons, Search for Bigfoot

Cindy: As we reported a few years ago in this Bookends post, our county could be hiding Bigfoot, and Michigan is a top site for hunting. So naturally, we were drawn to Melissa Savage’s debut novel, Lemons (2017), which features a pair of tween Bigfoot detectives! The first thing almost-11-year-old Lemonade Liberty Witt sees when […]

THE PHOTO ARK: A Delightful Deluge of Animal Portraits

THE PHOTO ARK: A Delightful Deluge of Animal Portraits

Lynn: We focus on youth books here at Bookends, but every so often, an adult book comes along that we think would be of special interest to kids. The Photo Ark: One Man’s Quest to Document the World’s Animals (2017) by Joel Sartore is just that sort of book. In fact, this book may be […]

STAR SCOUTS: Summer Camp, Science-Fiction Style

STAR SCOUTS: Summer Camp, Science-Fiction Style

Lynn: When you’re the new kid in town, finding friends can be tough. Mike Lawrence takes an out-of-this-world look at the issue in his recent graphic novel, Star Scouts (2017).  Barrel-racing, rodeo loving Avani Patel is having an especially hard time fitting into her new school, so her well-meaning dad signs her up for Flower […]

Full of Mysteries: BEYOND THE BRIGHT SEA by Lauren Wolk

Full of Mysteries: BEYOND THE BRIGHT SEA by Lauren Wolk

Cindy: Beyond the Bright Sea (2017), Lauren Wolk’s fine follow-up to her 2017 Newbery Honor book, Wolf Hollow, features a young orphan with a mysterious past, a hunt for treasure, and a search for belonging. Said orphan, the twelve-year-old Crow, is named for the rasping cry she emitted when Osh, a reclusive fisherman, found her as […]

OUT OF WONDER: Poems Celebrating Poets

OUT OF WONDER: Poems Celebrating Poets

Lynn: Regular readers know that we are seldom speechless—but that’s exactly what I was however when I finished Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets (2017) by Kwame Alexander, Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth. My powers of speech have definitely returned, but the awe has remained. There is so much that I love about this book that […]

THE LOTTERYS PLUS ONE: Emma Donoghue Writes for Middle-Graders

THE LOTTERYS PLUS ONE: Emma Donoghue Writes for Middle-Graders

Cindy: I grew up watching The Brady Bunch, but I can only imagine what fun someone could have with the new, millennial version of a blended family presented in The Lotterys Plus One (2017). When Lynn and I learned that Emma Donoghue (The Wonder, Room) had written her first middle-grade novel, we weren’t sure what to expect. […]

SEA OTTER HEROES to the Rescue

SEA OTTER HEROES to the Rescue

Lynn: In schools these days, we talk about science in terms of the scientific method, theories, observation, and conclusions. Pedagogically, this is excellent, but it is important not to lose sight of something that both drives and excites kids: asking questions. Young biologist Brent Hughes did just that. His question? Why was the fertilizer-polluted Elkhorn Slough […]