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Author Archive: Terry Hong

Terry Hong created and maintains Smithsonian BookDragon, a book blog for the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. She was the writer wrangler for the film Girl Rising. She taught for Duke University’s Leadership in the Arts in NYC. She co-authored two books, Eastern Standard Time: A Guide to Asian Influence on American Culture from Astro Boy to Zen Buddhism and What Do I Read Next? Multicultural Literature. She reviews extensively for many publications. Follow her on Twitter at @SIBookDragon.

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Beyond Books: Memoirs That Reckon with Death
By August 15, 2017 1 Comments Read More →

Beyond Books: Memoirs That Reckon with Death

Being part of the “sandwich generation” caught between aging parents and almost-adult children means that mortality begins to loom heavier as the years pass. Sharing the burden of tragedy with thoughtful, wise, and gentle others through books is certainly one of the most readily-available balms. For those moments you need a little guidance, here are […]

Favorite Manga Series, Part 2: Bakuman through What Did You Eat Yesterday?
By August 1, 2017 0 Comments Read More →

Favorite Manga Series, Part 2: Bakuman through What Did You Eat Yesterday?

Ready to get graphic? If you’re new to the genre, might I suggest you go directly to the godfather of manga, the late Osamu Tezuka (1928–1989). Astro Boy ring a bell? Speed Racer? Kimba the White Lion? “There’s a reason why the Japanese call [him] the God of Comics,” says Gene Luen Yang, the current National Ambassador for Young People’s […]

Favorite Manga Series, Part I: 20th Century Boys through Ultraman

Favorite Manga Series, Part I: 20th Century Boys through Ultraman

Graphic titles are big news. Even if you’re not a pop-culture connoisseur, you can’t have missed the graphic titles regularly popping up on bestseller lists—not to mention their various incarnations on film and even the stage! When Art Spiegelman won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for Maus, the genre got its can’t-be-ignored nod of mainstream (even highbrow) […]

Road Tripping with Eclectic Audiobooks

Road Tripping with Eclectic Audiobooks

Once upon a time, I was wary of audiobooks; I didn’t think they were “real” reading. How wrong I was! Two sparked an obsession: Feed by M.T. Anderson, read by David Aaron Baker, with a full production complete with brain-fed ads and instant messages before I even knew what they were (!), and Shantaram by […]

Ten Works of Contemporary Korean Literature in Translation

Ten Works of Contemporary Korean Literature in Translation

Despite Maureen Corrigan’s rather nasty NPR review of Korean author Kyung-sook Shin’s 2011 Stateside debut, Please Look After Mom—her phrase “cheap consolations of kimchee-scented Kleenex fiction” caused particular affront—Mom became a major bestseller. In a stroke of well-deserved vindication, Shin became the first woman to win the Man Asian Literary Prize and has been credited with revitalizing the Korean […]

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“Nope! I’ve never had any aspirations to be a musician”: Don Lee talks LONESOME LIES BEFORE US

“Nope! I’ve never had any aspirations to be a musician”: Don Lee talks LONESOME LIES BEFORE US

When Don Lee’s first book came out 16 years ago, he probably didn’t know then that more than half his writing career would be spent in Rosarita Bay, a fictional California seaside town that bears more than a passing resemblance to the real-world Half Moon Bay on Highway 1 in Northern California. Of the five books Lee […]

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Talking Race, Kid Lit, and EVERYBODY’S SON with Thrity Umrigar

Talking Race, Kid Lit, and EVERYBODY’S SON with Thrity Umrigar

About 15 years ago, when Thrity Umrigar was already a successful journalist and about to become an English professor, she attended a lecture at Emerson College in Boston and left with her first literary agent. Shortly thereafter, her debut novel, Bombay Time, hit the shelves. Balancing a reporter’s eye for detail with academic rigor, Umrigar has written six more novels, […]

14 Japanese Thrillers in Translation

14 Japanese Thrillers in Translation

Mysteries and thrillers make up a sizable portion of the Japanese literary market. Thanks to the international success of Keigo Higashino, Natsuo Kirino, and Miyuki Miyabe—and, just as importantly, their translators—contemporary Japanese crime fiction proliferates on Western shelves. To follow is a list of both novels and manga (because no one does graphic titles like […]

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Murakami in the Details: What to Read After MEN WITHOUT WOMEN

Murakami in the Details: What to Read After MEN WITHOUT WOMEN

The wait is over: Haruki Murakami’s latest collection of short stories hit shelves last week and yes, indeed—Men Without Women is a definitive seven-part delight. But once you’ve finished, the waiting begins yet again, oh sigh, for Maestro Murakami’s next book. In the meantime, we’ve prepared a mix-and-match pairing of these latest stories with some of Murakami’s older titles—a […]

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Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with 12 New Titles

Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with 12 New Titles

While Columbus is credited with discovering the Americas, notable scholars and historians have argued that Chinese explorers traveled around the world in the early 15th century and created a surviving map that shows America on its route. Imagine if those ancient explorers had stayed. The history of Asians who did stay in the Americas dates back to […]

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