Reviews of the Week: Drew Daywalt, R. J. Palacio, Diana Nyad, and More

Every weekday we feature a different review on Booklist Online. These reviews are notable for different reasons—they may be starred, or high-demand, or especially relevant to the current issue’s spotlight. We’ve collected the reviews from August 24–28 below, so you can revisit the best of the week.

The Day the Crayons Came HomeMonday, August 24

The Day the Crayons Came Home, by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

The crayons are back! Well, not all of them. Some of them are scattered hither and yon, and although they’d certainly like to return to Duncan, they’ll need his help for that. Happily, all have had access to postcards, which arrive for the boy in a single packet. These cards aren’t of the “wish-you-were-here” variety. See, Maroon Crayon has been lost under the couch since Duncan’s dad sat on him and broke him in half.

Auggie and MeTuesday, August 25

Auggie & Me: Three Wonder Stories, by R. J. Palacio

As Palacio explains in the introduction to this collection of three previously published e-book stories, calls for a sequel to Wonder (2012) are both frequent and ineffective—it’s not going to happen. Instead, she offers these deeper looks at three minor characters. In the abstract, it makes sense; the point of Wonder, after all, was about looking behind surfaces to find the nuance.

Idyll ThreatsWednesday, August 26

Idyll Threats, by Stephanie Gayle

After a devastating loss as a New York City cop, Thomas Lynch decides to start over as small-town police chief in Idyll, Connecticut. But small towns have big secrets, and when Cecilia North’s corpse is found on the town’s golf course, more than one resident has cause to withhold information about the night she was killed. Lynch is among them. He saw Cecilia hours before she died, but to explain the circumstances, he would have to tell his officers that he is gay.

Find a WayThursday, August 27

Find a Way: One Wild and Precious Life, by Diana Nyad

While Nyad has been a household name since 1975, when, at the age of 26, the swimmer famously circled the island of Manhattan (breaking the record by nearly an hour), and while the world was captivated by her successful completion—on her fifth attempt—of the nearly impossible, first-ever Cuba-to-Florida swim in 2013, at age 64, in just under 53 hours, casual observers might not fully comprehend the astonishing athleticism, force of will, and attention to detail she brought to bear until they finish this remarkable account.

The Story of Diva and FleaFriday, August 28

The Story of Diva and Flea, by Mo Willems and illustrated by Tony DiTerlizzi

Diva is a tiny white dog who lives in a grand, old apartment building in Paris, France. As the pet of the building’s gardienne, she patrols the courtyard, making sure that all is well. Flea, on the other hand, is a large cat who roams Paris’ streets. He is a great flâneur—“someone (or somecat) who . . . has seen everything, but still looks for more, because there is always something more to discover.”





About the Author:

Sarah Grant is the Marketing Associate for Booklist. Follow her on Twitter at @Booklist_Grant.

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